The Meisner Technique is an intensive training system for actors developed by renowned acting coach Sanford Meisner, who teaches actors how to behave instinctively and get in touch with their emotions. It’s known in the acting community as the “real people” technique, because it stresses realism and authenticity. Instead of merely acting sad, shocked or remorseful, an actor trained in the Meisner Technique really is sad, shocked or remorseful.

One of the technique’s greatest practitioners is Alec Baldwin, who has used it to great acclaim throughout his career, earning three Emmy Awards, three Golden Globes, eight SAG awards and an Oscar nomination.

Baldwin’s performance during a recent interview with ABC’s news actor/Democratic advisor George Stephanopoulos clearly draws upon this acting method and is so convincing, it’s as if Baldwin actually believes he had nothing to do with the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. To be clear, Baldwin shot and killed the woman. No one else did. It was a criminally negligent act.

But the previews of the ABC interview posted on social media tell a different story.

“The trigger wasn’t pulled. I didn’t pull the trigger. I would never point a gun at someone and pull the trigger on them, never,” Baldwin pleads into the camera, while pausing occasionally to wipe a tear from his eye.

The combination of Baldwin’s use of passive voice, the scene lighting, the camera framing and his strong delivery of obviously rehearsed lines is powerful. If I didn’t know a little bit about firearms, I would almost believe him. However, as Santa Fe County Sheriff Adan Mendoza – whose deputies are currently conducting a criminal investigation of Hutchins’ killing – recently said in response to Baldwin’s comments, “Guns just don’t go off.”

The good Sheriff is 100% correct. I’ve been around firearms for more than five decades, and have never seen one fire itself. Someone has to pull the trigger. I have, however, heard more than a few people involved in negligent shootings claim that they too never pulled the trigger. They did, as did Baldwin.

A Santa Fe County jury may someday get to decide if Baldwin’s horribly negligent act merits time behind bars. In my opinion, this is why he’s speaking out now. Baldwin knows his acting skills won’t help him much in a court of law, where it would be unlikely he’d ever take the stand, so he’s trying to win the case in the court of public opinion with Stephanopoulos, who has a reputation for lobbing only softballs. It’s an overt attempt at jury nullification. I won’t be watching the entire interview. I don’t think my stomach could take it. The previews were nauseous enough.

Baldwin’s first acting role was in 1982 on the NBC soap opera “The Doctors.” He’s starred or co-starred in more than 145 films and television shows since – a few good, a few bad – but I predict he will be remembered most for a low-budget Western no one will ever see, which cost a promising young cinematographer her life.